Whitehouse Centers for Disease Control and Prevention US Department of Homeland Security - Federal Emergency Management Agency

About COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic, and the fear and isolation that often come with it, can be overwhelming to adults and children. You may worry about your health or financial situation, and may experience changes in sleep or eating patterns, worsening of health problems, including mental health problems, or increased substance use.

Finding a healthy way to cope with stress will make you and the people you care about, stronger. Some of the best ways to cope with stress are:

  • Know what to do and who to contact if you get sick.
  • Take care of your emotional health.
  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories.
  • Exercise regularly, eat healthy meals, and get plenty of sleep.
  • Connect with others in a safe way.

More information on how people react to stress, how to copy with stress and anxiety, and what to do in an emergency is available from the CDC at Coping with Stress.

Last updated July 17, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness that can spread from person to person. There are many types of human coronaviruses, including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused by a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans.

Read about COVID-19 Symptoms

Last updated April 30, 2020
Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site, U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

People with COVID-19 should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. People with mild symptoms are able to recover at home. If you experience a medical emergency such as trouble breathing, call 911 and let the operator know you may have COVID-19. For severe illness, treatment should include care to support vital organ functions.

Currently there are no FDA-approved drugs specifically for the treatment of COVID-19. Researchers are studying new drugs, and drugs that are already approved for other health conditions, as possible treatments for COVID-19. The FDA is working with drug manufacturers, researchers, and other partners to accelerate the development process for COVID-19 treatments. CDC has more information for health care providers about these potential treatments. Never take a prescription medicine or drug if it is not prescribed for you by your doctor for your health condition.

Last updated April 15, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

People in the U.S. may be worried or anxious about friends and relatives who are living in or visiting areas where COVID-19 is spreading. Some people are worried about getting the disease from these people. Fear and anxiety can lead to social stigma, for example, toward people who live in certain parts of the world, people who have traveled internationally, people who were in quarantine, or healthcare professionals.

Stigma is discrimination against an identifiable group of people, a place, or a nation. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger toward ordinary people instead of focusing on the disease that is causing the problem.

Last updated April 04, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

Yes. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has a list of essential industries, available online.

Those industries include:

  • Healthcare/Public Health (i.e. hospitals and doctors)
  • Law Enforcement, Public Safety and First Responders (i.e. police and Emergency Management Services)
  • Food and Agriculture (i.e. farmers and food manufacturers)
  • Energy (i.e. natural gas and nuclear facilities)
  • Water and Waste water (i.e. water department)
  • Transportation and Logistics (i.e. trucking and shipping)
  • Public Works and Infrastructure (i.e. safety inspectors for public facilities including dams, bridges, etc.)
  • Communications and Information Technology (i.e. maintainers of communications infrastructure, such as wireless, internet and cable providers)
  • Community and Local Government (i.e. federal, state, local, tribal and territorial employees who support Mission Essential Functions)
  • Critical Manufacturing (i.e. metals, PPE, supply chain minerals and employees that support other essential services)
  • Hazardous Materials (i.e. healthcare waste and nuclear facilities)
  • Financial Services (i.e. banks)
  • Chemical (i.e. workers supporting the chemical and industrial gas supply chains)
  • Defense Industrial (i.e. essential services required to meet national security commitments to the federal government and U.S. Military)
  • Commercial Facilities (i.e. workers who support the supply chain of building materials)
  • Residential/Shelter Facilities (i.e. workers in dependent care services)
  • Hygiene Products and Services (i.e. laundromats, personal and household goods repair and maintenance)

While this guidance is not a federal mandate, and final decisions remain at the state and local levels, we firmly believe it can serve as a baseline for a common national approach in prioritizing essential services and workers.

Last updated March 29, 2020
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Securitylinks to external site

Don’t let anyone rush you into making a donation. Never donate in cash, by gift card, or by wiring money. Get tips from on researching charities and donating wisely from the Federal Trade Commission at ftc.gov/charity.

Last updated July 17, 2020
Source: Federal Trade Commissionlinks to external site

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) executes the Secretary of Homeland Security’s responsibilities as assigned under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to provide strategic guidance, promote a national unity of effort, and coordinate the overall federal effort to ensure the security and resilience of the Nation’s critical infrastructure.

The list determining essential industries was developed in coordination with federal agencies and the critical infrastructure community as a guide to help state and local governments make decisions around reasonable accommodations for essential workers.

The list is meant to be broad enough to reflect the range of personnel that play a role in infrastructure resilience – including manufacturing, logistics, and others that support the global supply chain.

While this guidance is not a federal mandate, and final decisions remain at the state and local levels, we firmly believe it can serve as a baseline for a common national approach in prioritizing essential services and workers.

Last updated March 29, 2020
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Securitylinks to external site

The mortality rate is the percentage of people who died due to COVID-19 out of the total number of people with COVID-19 reported. Since this is an ongoing outbreak, the percentage can change daily. There are several reasons for this, such as there may be delays in reporting of additional confirmed cases of COVID-19 and not all COVID-19 cases will be detected.

Last updated June 25, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

The COVID-19 death count shown on the Cases in the U.S. web page includes deaths reported daily by state, local, and territorial health departments. This count reflects the most up-to-date information received by CDC based on preliminary reporting from health departments.

In contrast, provisional COVID-19 death counts from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) are updated Monday through Friday with information collected from death certificates. These data represent the most accurate death counts. However, because it can take several weeks for death certificates to be submitted and processed, there is on average a delay of 1–2 weeks before they are reported. Therefore, the provisional death counts may not include all deaths that occurred during a given time period, especially for more recent periods. Death counts from earlier weeks are continually revised and may increase or decrease as new and updated death certificate data are received. Provisional COVID-19 death counts may therefore differ from those on other published sources, such as media reports or the Cases in the U.S. web page.

Last updated June 25, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

CDC’s overall case numbers are validated through a confirmation process with jurisdictions. The process used for finding and confirming cases displayed by different places may differ.

Case numbers reported on other websites may differ from what is posted on CDC’s website because CDC’s overall case numbers are validated through a confirmation process with each jurisdiction. Differences between reporting jurisdictions and CDC’s website may occur due to the timing of reporting and website updates. The process used for finding and confirming cases displayed by other sites may differ.

Last updated June 25, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

On February 11, 2020 the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV”.

There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused be a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans.

Last updated June 20, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site