Whitehouse Centers for Disease Control and Prevention US Department of Homeland Security - Federal Emergency Management Agency

Community events

If there is minimal or moderate spread of COVID-19 in the community, CDC recommends cancelling an:

  • event that includes 250 people or more.
  • event likely to have 10 or more people who are at higher risk of serious COVID-19 illness. This includes older adults and people with underlying health problems such as lung or heart disease and diabetes.

If there is substantial spread of COVID-19 in the community, CDC recommends cancelling events of any size. See guidance for definitions of minimal, moderate, and substantial spread (PDF).

Last updated March 29, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

The risk of transmitting or spreading SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, during vacuuming is unknown. At this time, there are no reported cases of COVID-19 associated with vacuuming. If vacuuming is necessary or required in a school, business, or community facility that was used by a person with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, first follow the CDC recommendations for Cleaning and Disinfection for Community Facilities that apply, which includes a wait time of 24 hours, or as long as practical.

After cleaning and disinfection, the following recommendations may help reduce the risk to workers and other individuals when vacuuming:

  • Consider removing smaller rugs or carpets from the area completely, so there is less that needs to be vacuumed.
  • Use a vacuum equipped with a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, if available.
  • Do not vacuum a room or space that has people in it. Wait until the room or space is empty to vacuum, such as at night, for common spaces, or during the day for private rooms.
  • Consider temporarily turning off room fans and the central HVAC system that services the room or space, so that particles that escape from vacuuming will not circulate throughout the facility.

Last updated May 04, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

Encourage staff and attendees to take everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses such as COVID-19. This includes:

  • Cleaning your hands often.
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying home when you are sick.
  • Covering coughs and sneezes with a tissue or the inside of your elbow.
  • Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces.

Last updated March 15, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

Creating an emergency plan for mass gatherings and large community events, such as concerts and sporting events, can help protect the health of your staff, attendees, and the local community. This planning should include:

  • Encouraging staff and attendees to stay home if sick.
  • Developing flexible refund policies for attendees.
  • Providing supplies for attendees and staff that can be used to help prevent the spread of germs.
  • Consulting local public health officials about your event.

Last updated March 15, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

CDC has guidance for cleaning and disinfecting rooms and areas where a person with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 has visited. See Environmental Cleaning and Disinfection Recommendations.

Last updated March 15, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

Consult with local public health officials and keep asking yourself, based on current conditions, whether to postpone, cancel, or significantly reduce the number of attendees (if possible) at an event or gathering. When determining if you should postpone or cancel a large gathering or event, consider the:

  • Overall number of attendees or crowd size.
  • Number of attendees who are at higher risk of developing serious illness from COVID-19. This includes older adults and people with underlying health problems such as lung or heart disease and diabetes.
  • How close together attendees will be at the event.
  • Potential ways to minimize economic impact to attendees, staff, and the local community.
  • Amount of spread in local community and the communities from where your attendees are likely to travel.
  • Needs and capacity of the local community to host or participate in your event.

Last updated March 15, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

If a staff member or attendee becomes sick at your event, separate them from others as soon as possible and until they can go home. Provide them with clean, disposable facemasks to wear, if available. If not available, provide them with a tissue or some other way to cover their coughs and sneezes. If needed, contact emergency services for those who need emergency care. Public transportation, shared rides, and taxis should be avoided for sick persons.

Be sure to contact local public health officials regarding the possible case of COVID-19 at your event and communicate with staff and attendees about possible exposure to the virus. Read more about preventing the spread of COVID-19 if someone is sick.

Last updated March 15, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

If there is minimal or moderate spread of COVID-19 in the community, CDC recommends cancelling an:

  • event that includes 250 people or more.
  • event likely to have 10 or more people who are at higher risk of serious COVID-19 illness. This includes older adults and people with underlying health problems such as lung or heart disease and diabetes.

If there is substantial spread of COVID-19 in the community, CDC recommends cancelling events of any size.

Last updated March 15, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

Regular cleaning staff can clean and disinfect community spaces. Cleaning staff should be trained on appropriate use of cleaning and disinfection chemicals and provided with the personal protective equipment (PPE) required for the chemicals used.

Last updated May 04, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site