Whitehouse Centers for Disease Control and Prevention US Department of Homeland Security - Federal Emergency Management Agency

Food safety and access

There is no evidence to suggest that food produced in the United States or imported from countries affected by COVID-19 can transmit COVID-19.

Last updated April 15, 2020 | Source: FDAlinks to external site

Currently there is no evidence of food, food containers, or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19. Like other viruses, it is possible that the virus that causes COVID-19 can survive on surfaces or objects. For that reason, it is critical to follow the 4 key steps of food safety: clean, separate, cook, and chill.

If you are concerned about contamination of food or food packaging, wash your hands after handling food packaging, after removing food from the packaging, before you prepare food for eating and before you eat. Consumers can follow CDC guidelines on frequent hand washing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds; and frequent cleaning and disinfecting of surfaces.

Last updated April 15, 2020 | Source: FDAlinks to external site

Currently there is no evidence of food or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19.

Unlike foodborne gastrointestinal (GI) viruses like norovirus and hepatitis A that often make people ill through contaminated food, SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, is a virus that causes respiratory illness and not gastrointestinal illness, and foodborne exposure to this virus is not known to be a route of transmission.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. That’s why it’s always critical to follow the 4 key steps of food safety:clean, separate, cook, and chill.

Last updated April 15, 2020 | Source: FDAlinks to external site

There are no nationwide shortages of food, although in some cases the inventory of certain foods at your grocery store might be temporarily low before stores can restock. Food production and manufacturing are widely dispersed throughout the U.S. and there are currently no widespread disruptions reported in the supply chain.

FDA is closely monitoring the food supply chain for any shortages in collaboration with industry and our federal and state partners. We are in regular contact with food manufacturers and grocery stores.

Last updated April 15, 2020 | Source: FDAlinks to external site

We are not aware of any reports at this time of human illnesses that suggest COVID-19 can be transmitted by food or food packaging. However, it is always important to follow good hygiene practices (i.e., wash hands and surfaces often, separate raw meat from other foods, cook to the right temperature, and refrigerate foods promptly) when handling or preparing foods.

Last updated April 26, 2020 | Source: USDAlinks to external site

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) provides tips on food planning, including what to buy, how much to buy, and preparation tips.

Last updated April 26, 2020 | Source: USDAlinks to external site

The latest information on nutrition assistance is available on the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) website, including a state-by-state breakdown of flexibilities available in each nutrition assistance program.

Last updated April 26, 2020 | Source: USDAlinks to external site