Whitehouse Centers for Disease Control and Prevention US Department of Homeland Security - Federal Emergency Management Agency

Treatments and immunity

Currently there are no FDA-approved medicines specifically for COVID-19. However, the FDA has granted emergency use authorizations (EUA) for some medicines to be used for certain patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Emergency use authorizations are issued when there are no adequate, approved, and available options and timely access to medical products is important. The EUA may be revoked at any time.

Medicine currently available because of an EUA include:

  • Veklury (remdesivir)
  • Olumiant (baricitinib)
  • Bamlanivimab, a monoclonal antibody
  • Casirivimib and imdevimab, monoclonal antibodies, sometimes called by the corporate name, Regeneron

These and all prescription medicines should be prescribed by your doctor based upon your specific needs. Never take a prescription medicine or drug if it is not prescribed for you by your doctor for your health condition. People with COVID-19 should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. People with mild symptoms are able to recover at home. If you experience a medical emergency such as trouble breathing, call 911 and let the operator know you may have COVID-19.

The National Institutes of Health provides more information about treatment options.

For information on the COVID-19 Vaccination Program and COVID-19 vaccines, see the CDC’s 8 Things to Know about Vaccines.

Last updated December 10, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

No. Antibiotics do not work against viruses; they only work on bacterial infections. Antibiotics do not prevent or treat coronavirus disease (COVID-19), because COVID-19 is caused by a virus, not bacteria. Some patients with COVID-19 may also develop a bacterial infection, such as pneumonia. In that case, a health care professional may treat the bacterial infection with an antibiotic.

Last updated October 15, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

Currently, there is no evidence to suggest that taking any specific medications, like blood pressure medication or ibuprofen, leads to more severe illness from COVID-19.

Continue to take your medications and to follow your treatment plan as prescribed by your healthcare provider. Any changes to your medications should only be made after talking with your healthcare provider.

Contact your healthcare provider if you have questions or concerns.

Last updated January 14, 2021
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

We do not know yet if people who recover from COVID-19 can get infected again. CDC and partners are investigating to determine if a person can get sick with COVID-19 more than once. Until we know more, continue to take steps to protect yourself and others.

Last updated June 29, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

Yes. On December 11, 2020 the FDA issued an Emergency Use Authorization for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine. On December 18, 2020, the FDA issued an Emergency Use Authorization for the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine.

Additionally, the FDA is working with other vaccine developers, researchers, and manufacturers to help expedite the development and availability of medical products such as additional vaccines and antibodies, and drugs to prevent or treat COVID-19.

Read more about what the FDA is doing to mitigate the effects of COVID-19.

Visit CDC’s 8 Things to Know about Vaccines for information about the new COVID-19 Vaccination Program and COVID-19 vaccines.

Last updated December 18, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available. Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like covering your mouth and nose with a mask and staying at least 6 feet away from others, help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

Last updated December 12, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

Multiple COVID-19 vaccines are under development. As of November 24, 2020, large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials are in progress or being planned for five COVID-19 vaccines in the United States.

The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine has been authorized for emergency use by the FDA under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) on December 11, 2020. The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine has been authorized for emergency use by the FDA under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) on December 18, 2020. Both are currently being administered in the U.S.

Last updated December 24, 2020
Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site, U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

The federal government is committed to providing free or low-cost COVID-19 vaccines. Vaccine doses purchased with U.S. taxpayer dollars will be given to the American people at no cost. However, vaccination providers will be able to charge an administration fee for giving the shot to someone. Most public and private insurance companies will cover that fee so there is no cost for the person getting vaccinated. In addition, people without health insurance can get COVID-19 vaccines at no cost.

Last updated October 26, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

When FDA first authorizes or approves the use of one or more COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, there may be a limited supply. This would mean that not everyone will be able to be vaccinated right away. It is understandable how concerning this will be for people, especially for those who are at increased risk for serious illness from this virus and for their loved ones.

That is why, early in the response, the federal government began investing in select vaccine manufacturers to help them increase their ability to quickly make and distribute a large amount of COVID-19 vaccine. This will allow the United States to start with as much vaccine as possible and continually increase the supply in the weeks and months to follow. The goal is for everyone to be able to easily get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as large quantities are available. Whether it’s at their doctor’s office, retail pharmacy, hospital, or federally qualified health center, several thousand vaccination providers will be available so no one will have to travel far to be vaccinated.

Last updated October 26, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

CDC is making recommendations for who should be offered COVID-19 vaccine first when supplies are limited. To help guide decisions about how to distribute limited initial supplies of COVID-19 vaccine, CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) have published recommendations for which groups should be vaccinated first. The goal is for everyone to be able to easily get a COVID-19 vaccination as soon as large quantities of vaccine are available.

While CDC makes recommendations for who should be offered COVID-19 vaccine first, each state has its own plan for vaccine prioritization, distribution, and allocation. Please contact your state health department for more information on their planning for COVID-19 vaccines.

Learn how CDC is making COVID-19 vaccine recommendations, including recommendations if there is a limited supply, based on input from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

Last updated January 14, 2021
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

A COVID-19 vaccination should be offered to you regardless of whether you already had the COVID-19 infection. You should not be required to have an antibody test before you are vaccinated.

However, anyone currently infected with COVID-19 should wait to get vaccinated until after their illness has resolved and after they have met the criteria to stop isolation.

Additionally, current evidence suggests that reinfection with the virus that causes COVID-19 is uncommon in the 90 days after initial infection. Therefore, people with a recent infection may delay vaccination until the end of that 90-day period if they choose to.

Last updated January 14, 2021
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

Operation Warp Speed is a partnership among components of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Defense to help develop, make, and distribute millions of vaccine doses for COVID-19 as quickly as possible while ensuring that the vaccines are safe and that they work. Learn more about Operation Warp Speed:

Last updated October 26, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

COVID-19 convalescent plasma must only be collected from recovered individuals if they are eligible to donate blood. Individuals must have had a prior diagnosis of COVID-19 documented by a laboratory test and meet other laboratory criteria. Individuals must have fully recovered from COVID-19, with complete resolution of symptoms for at least 14 days before donation of convalescent plasma. You can ask your local blood center if there are options to donate convalescent plasma in your area.

Learn more about how to donate.

Last updated October 16, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

On October 22, 2020, the FDA approved Veklury (remdesivir) for certain COVID-19 patients. Remdesivir is approved for adults and children 12 years and older, who weigh at least 88 pounds, and are in the hospital.

Last updated November 24, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

No. While there are approved uses for ivermectin in people and animals, it is not approved for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19. You should not take any medicine to treat or prevent COVID-19 unless it has been prescribed to you by your health care provider and acquired from a legitimate source.

A recently released research article described the effect of ivermectin on SARS-CoV-2 in a laboratory setting. These types of laboratory studies are commonly used at an early stage of drug development. Additional testing is needed to determine whether ivermectin might be appropriate to prevent or treat coronavirus or COVID-19. Read more about ivermectin.

Last updated October 15, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

Based on a review of the scientific evidence, chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate are unlikely to be effective in treating COVID-19. In light of ongoing serious cardiac adverse events and other potential serious side effects of these treatments in COVID-19 patients, the known and potential benefits no longer outweigh the known and potential risks for use.

The FDA revoked an emergency use authorization for use of hydroxychloroquine sulfate and chloroquine phosphate as a COVID-19 treatment on June 15, 2020 based on FDA’s review of the scientific evidence.

Read more about this decision.

Last updated October 15, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

No. Products marketed for veterinary use, “for research only,” or otherwise not for human consumption have not been evaluated for safety or effectiveness and should never be used by humans. FDA is aware that chloroquine phosphate is marketed to treat disease in aquarium fish, but these products have not been evaluated by FDA to determine if they are safe, effective, properly manufactured, and adequately labeled. The agency continues to work with online marketplaces to remove these items, and many have been removed based on these efforts. Patients should not take any form of chloroquine unless it has been prescribed by a licensed health care provider. Chloroquine products also should not be given to pets or livestock unless prescribed by a veterinarian.

Last updated October 15, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

At this point, there are no vaccines or cures for COVID-19 available to the public, so you know that any claim to the contrary is false. In fact, the Federal Trade Commission has sent hundreds of warning letters to companies making false cure, treatment, or prevention claims. And more letters are on the way. If you see a product claiming to treat, cure, or prevent coronavirus, report it to the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint.

Last updated July 17, 2020
Source: Federal Trade Commissionlinks to external site

Currently, there are no FDA-approved products for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19. The FDA advises consumers to be beware of websites and stores selling products that claim to prevent, treat, or cure COVID-19. If you have a question about a product sold online that claims to treat, prevent, or cure COVID-19, talk to your health care provider or doctor.

Please report websites selling products with fraudulent claims about treatment or prevention of COVID-19. If you have experienced a bad reaction to a product sold with COVID-19 claims, report it to the FDA’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program:

  • Complete and submit the report online; or
  • Download and complete the form (PDF), then submit it via fax at 1-800-FDA-0178.
  • Include as much information as you can about the product that caused the reaction, including the product name, the manufacturer, and the lot number (if available).

This consumer update and video can help you learn how to protect yourself and your family from fraud.

Last updated October 16, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

No. According to the FDA, there are currently no products or treatments available to the public that can prevent, treat or cure COVID-19. Some sellers may offer “treatments” in clinics or medical offices, including intravenous Vitamin C and D infusions, stem cell therapy, and immunity boosting shots. However, these are not FDA approved treatments. Any claims to the contrary are false. If you’re tempted to buy an unproven product or one with questionable claims, check with your doctor or other health care professional first.

Last updated August 12, 2020
Source: Federal Trade Commissionlinks to external site

No. Miracle Mineral Solution does not cure COVID-19 and has not been approved by the FDA for any use. The solution, when mixed, develops into a dangerous bleach which has caused serious and potentially life-threatening side effects. For more information, see: FDA warns consumers about the dangerous and potentially life threatening side effects of Miracle Mineral Solution and Danger: Don’t Drink Miracle Mineral Solution or Similar Products.

Last updated October 15, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

The FDA has established a cross-agency team dedicated to closely monitoring for fraudulent COVID-19 products. In response to internet scammers, the FDA has taken – and continues to take – actions to stop those selling unapproved products that fraudulently claim to prevent, treat, diagnose, or cure COVID-19. The FDA and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issue warning letters to companies and individuals that are unlawfully selling unapproved products with fraudulent COVID-19 claims.

The FDA also has taken enforcement action against certain sellers that continued to illegally market products for prevention or treatment of COVID-19.

Additionally, the FDA also has reached out to major retailers to ask for their help in monitoring online marketplaces for fraudulent COVID-19 products. You can report websites selling fraudulent medical products to the FDA through our website, by phone at 1-800-332-1088, or
email the FDA at FDA-COVID-19-Fraudulent-Products@fda.hhs.gov

Read more in the consumer update on fraudulent products.

Last updated October 16, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

DIY ventilator makers may request that their product be added to the Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) that FDA issued on March 24, 2020, to legally market the product in the U.S. Instructions on how to do so, and the criteria for ventilator safety, performance and labeling, may be found in the Letter of Authorization and Appendix A for the EUA related to ventilators, anesthesia gas machines modified for use as ventilators, positive pressure breathing devices modified for use as ventilators, ventilator tubing connectors, and ventilator accessories.

Last updated October 15, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site