Whitehouse Centers for Disease Control and Prevention US Department of Homeland Security - Federal Emergency Management Agency

Vaccines

Yes. On December 11, 2020 the FDA issued an Emergency Use Authorization for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine. On December 18, 2020, the FDA issued an Emergency Use Authorization for the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine.

Additionally, the FDA is working with other vaccine developers, researchers, and manufacturers to help expedite the development and availability of medical products such as additional vaccines and antibodies, and drugs to prevent or treat COVID-19.

Read more about what the FDA is doing to mitigate the effects of COVID-19.

Visit CDC’s 8 Things to Know about Vaccines for information about the new COVID-19 Vaccination Program and COVID-19 vaccines.

Last updated December 18, 2020
Source: U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

Multiple COVID-19 vaccines are under development. As of November 24, 2020, large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials are in progress or being planned for five COVID-19 vaccines in the United States.

The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine has been authorized for emergency use by the FDA under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) on December 11, 2020. The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine has been authorized for emergency use by the FDA under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) on December 18, 2020. Both are currently being administered in the U.S.

Last updated December 24, 2020
Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site, U.S. Food & Drug Administrationlinks to external site

CDC is making recommendations for who should be offered COVID-19 vaccine first when supplies are limited. To help guide decisions about how to distribute limited initial supplies of COVID-19 vaccine, CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) have published recommendations for which groups should be vaccinated first. The goal is for everyone to be able to easily get a COVID-19 vaccination as soon as large quantities of vaccine are available.

While CDC makes recommendations for who should be offered COVID-19 vaccine first, each state has its own plan for vaccine prioritization, distribution, and allocation. Please contact your state health department for more information on their planning for COVID-19 vaccines.

Learn how CDC is making COVID-19 vaccine recommendations, including recommendations if there is a limited supply, based on input from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

Last updated January 14, 2021
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

When FDA first authorizes or approves the use of one or more COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, there may be a limited supply. This would mean that not everyone will be able to be vaccinated right away. It is understandable how concerning this will be for people, especially for those who are at increased risk for serious illness from this virus and for their loved ones.

That is why, early in the response, the federal government began investing in select vaccine manufacturers to help them increase their ability to quickly make and distribute a large amount of COVID-19 vaccine. This will allow the United States to start with as much vaccine as possible and continually increase the supply in the weeks and months to follow. The goal is for everyone to be able to easily get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as large quantities are available. Whether it’s at their doctor’s office, retail pharmacy, hospital, or federally qualified health center, several thousand vaccination providers will be available so no one will have to travel far to be vaccinated.

Last updated October 26, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available. Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like covering your mouth and nose with a mask and staying at least 6 feet away from others, help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

Last updated December 12, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

The federal government is committed to providing free or low-cost COVID-19 vaccines. Vaccine doses purchased with U.S. taxpayer dollars will be given to the American people at no cost. However, vaccination providers will be able to charge an administration fee for giving the shot to someone. Most public and private insurance companies will cover that fee so there is no cost for the person getting vaccinated. In addition, people without health insurance can get COVID-19 vaccines at no cost.

Last updated October 26, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

A COVID-19 vaccination should be offered to you regardless of whether you already had the COVID-19 infection. You should not be required to have an antibody test before you are vaccinated.

However, anyone currently infected with COVID-19 should wait to get vaccinated until after their illness has resolved and after they have met the criteria to stop isolation.

Additionally, current evidence suggests that reinfection with the virus that causes COVID-19 is uncommon in the 90 days after initial infection. Therefore, people with a recent infection may delay vaccination until the end of that 90-day period if they choose to.

Last updated January 14, 2021
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site

Operation Warp Speed is a partnership among components of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Defense to help develop, make, and distribute millions of vaccine doses for COVID-19 as quickly as possible while ensuring that the vaccines are safe and that they work. Learn more about Operation Warp Speed:

Last updated October 26, 2020
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlinks to external site